Reviews

A propulsive and twisting thriller that seems especially relevant today with all the death running tragically amok among seniors.” – Dan Kalla, author of Pandemic, We All Fall Down, and The Last High

THE NIGHT NURSE, folks. Seriously, the first thing I have to say is that I want to read more. The way Berryman writes is captivating, cerebral and tangible at the same time. I was grateful his main character wasn’t a chef because the images that floated, washed, exploded and sparkled off the pages would have been seriously hard to resist if he’d been describing food the way he did his character’s thoughts, actions and feelings. I was challenged at first because I know Tony and could almost hear him narrating the story, which isn’t a bad thing by any means but definitely distracting. It only lasted a couple of pages because the magic took over and I was completely and utterly immersed in the world of Jackson Teague, Nurse Wendy and the others.

Set mainly in Vancouver, it was wonderful to travel through the beautiful west coast city, fragrant with the lushness of the seasons and the scent of the ocean that provided the perfectly set background for the book. The amount of research and experience Tony brought to his novel is obvious only in the sense that the information flows so naturally allowing for the rest of the plot – deliciously twisty plot – to snap the reader up and deposit them back down like a literary tornado.

When I closed the book, I got up to stretch and then promptly sat back down to continue reading. I read every word, right to the back cover and then sat bereft that it was over and then instantly impressed and excited for more. Of course, I did what you should never do and messaged Tony to find out when his next book is out… I’ll let him reveal that little nugget, but there is a short story that will tease you just enough on his Facebook page. BUT FIRST, buy this book! Get in virtual line pals, this is one helluva read. Thanks Tony, and congrats! – Courtney Allen, Bacchus Books

Clever and engaging. The concept is a good one — a murdering nurse is identified by a massage therapist who works with the same patients, but can’t prove anything. What really raises this book up from the usual whodunnit is the inventive approach to the massage therapist’s condition, a type of obsessive compulsive disorder that allows him to see patterns in everything — traffic, winds, waves, and even furniture arrangements. This proves to be both a handicap and a blessing when going head to head with a killer. The writing is excellent, and the characters are both well-drawn and memorable. – Elinor Florence, author of Bird’s Eye View, Wildwood, and My Favourite Veterans: True Stories of World War Two’s Hometown Heroes

An edge-of-your-seat debut thriller, with a refreshingly unique hero and villainess. Love the way this author turns a phrase. Love the cover, too. – Roxy